Jeff Kendall-Weed Rides Los Angeles on the Ibis Ripmo

Jeff Kendall-Weed Rides Los Angeles on the Ibis Ripmo

 
 
 
Trails in Los Angeles?
Riding LAX With Jeff Kendall-Weed

Photography by John Watson // Video by Logan Nelson // Words by Jeff Kendall-Weed

On the west side of the city of angels, the deep blue ocean meets endless sandy beaches, creating an obvious frontier of sand against water. However, Los Angeles has a second, and lesser known, frontier that lies to the north--and it's one that we mountain bikers can embrace. The second frontier boasts a similar juxtaposition of opposites. A vast set of rugged, alpine mountains borders the LA valley, guarding it from the heat of the parched Southern California desert, making for some unbelievable views and even more unbelievable riding. 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Overlooking downtown Los Angeles from over 5,000' atop Mount Lukens.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 The cell service was incredible!

Exploring this northern boundary further, it's possible that within sight of one of the largest metropolitan areas in North America, this hideaway offers more than solitude and abundant wildlife. It's a playground of trails and features that will reward anyone who puts their tacky rubber to the granite.
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 One man's trash is another man's sketchy, DIY kicker ramp.

Growing up over 300 miles north in the black dirt and redwood rain forest of Santa Cruz, CA, I never thought much about the mountain biking further south. But, while attending university in San Luis Obispo, CA, my classmates and I would often headed south for races. We'd usually end up well-within city limits, pedaling past backyards and burned-out, junked cars. There had to be something better, we knew. We could see the jagged peaks surrounding us as we sprinted past fast-food restaurants and soccer games. I always wondered if those big peaks had trails… 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Moist, decomposed granite soil is amazing! And there are about 4 million people below us in that sprawling urban jungle below this turn.

Cue the release of a new bike, the Ibis Ripmo. I knew literally nothing about the bike the day it arrived on my doorstep in western Washington on a stormy evening in late February. While my preliminary snowy rides gave me a rough idea of what to expect of the bike, I figured: what better excuse than this new bike to finally commit to a trip exploring the mountains surrounding that city of cement and traffic and movie magic? It seemed fitting. I had a new bike that I had zero prior knowledge of, and a new mountain range to tackle with it. It was time to follow the Hollywood dream, or something like that. 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 There are some gems hidden among the steep mountains. Finding airtime thanks to a pile of stones.

Well, to LAX. A quick couple flights transported me from the legitimate mountain bike mecca (albeit a gray and cold one) that I call home near Seattle, to the sun and smog of Los Angeles. Was I crazy? I began to think maybe I was. But upon the final descent into the airport, I could see a fresh dusting of snow on the peaks surrounding LA. The scene looked like heaven--and by heaven, I mean the amazing conditions that moist decomposed granite soil offers. 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 As desert as this may look, it's still a lot lusher than the actual Mojave desert.

To make the most of my mission south, I spoke with about a half dozen Los Angeles area riders to ask about the trails. I spoke with about a half dozen in all. While I wanted to include them all in the experience, time was limited. I needed to focus on riding foremost, but also on getting photos and videos. John Watson had shown me some amazing photos, so I figured he'd be a great guy to capture just how rad the bike and the trails could be. John had also shot photos all over the region, so he lent a knowledgeable perspective to the spots we'd ride. Plus, John's background in architecture made him look at the trail within the landscape in a way that only a true connoisseur of design, shapes, and textures could. All of this contrasted nicely with my "send it or leave it" approach. Once we linked up with John, it was on.
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 There's just something fun about finding natural jump lines. Bonus points if you can air over the local flora.

As is usually the case, once our knobbies hit the ground, time flew. We initially explored a network of trails near Simi Valley, which had some large sandstone formations overlooking--you guessed it--a freeway! With airplane legs and tired eyes, we rode and shot what we could. As the winds picked up, and temperatures began to drop, we watched the soaring vultures overhead and the random hikers flying drones among the grassy hills. 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 When in doubt, air it out. The new bike ended up really liking jumps, and seemed to fetch a surprising amount of distance out of any jump.

We moved on to Mt Lukens, with its massive-for-city-limits altitude of over 5,000 feet. Lukens did not disappoint. We enjoyed the fast turns with their postcard views of the expansive city below us. This is one of the original ideas that prompted the trip to the unlikely destination- the ability to not just ride so close to a major skyline, but to actually see it from our trailside vantage point. The trails were great, too- narrow singletrack, that descends a steep mountain via substantial bench cut, with poison oak consequences for any excessive speeds. 

To complement the first couple days, we then began to get more alpine, moving up to Chilao region of the San Gabriel range, where we rode the Silver Moccasin trail. This area is amazing. It's like a Stonehenge of granite, a bit of a playground for anyone with an eye towards air-time and the patience required to find some lines. The trails are fun on everything from a rigid single speed, where simply cleaning the lines would be a challenge, all the way to a modern enduro shred-sled. The modern bike allows for even bigger sends and trail interpretation, though we could definitely understand how a more traditional bike would be a great, fun challenge on the trail as well. 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 The view from the Chilao Region- layers upon layers. Legend has it that the region was named after a man who killed a bear with nothing more than a hunting knife. We didn't find any bears, which is fortunate as TSA took our knives.

After a full day on two wheels, we spent the night at Chilao, enjoying good company and the vacation from internet connectivity. While the mountains around us blocked much of the light pollution from Los Angeles, we were actually able to see the stars. Temperatures at these altitudes drop quickly, and we enjoyed discussing the days accomplishments and failures both around the campfire. In the big picture, we were glad that the snow had melted enough for us to ride, leaving amazing conditions. While this trip was not any sort of epic bike packing mission, it was indeed a bit of a push to end multiple days of filming and riding with a night in a tent. 
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 Spinning up to the Silver Moccasin trail, in the proper alpine meadows.
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 The possibilities on the granite playgrounds are only limited by your energy, imagination, and risk tolerance.
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 Chasing shadows down rock spines. Or was that an ancient petroglyph? We didn't stop to examine further.
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Why take a race line when there is no race? Riding the trail next to the trail, while never leaving the granite.
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 Granite is the among the most fun, most forgiving rock, providing ample traction and a smooth surface.
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Finding lines, connecting dots.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Protein and carbohydrates, here's a proper camp meal.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Logan tends to the fire. Mr Nelson's professionalism and attention to detail

The following morning, we returned to the sandy trails after the classic camping breakfast of leftovers scrambled with some eggs, and packaged haphazardly in some frigid tortillas, dripping in hot sauce. We had some big tasks on hand, as we had to capture all the shredding that we couldn't fit into the first day at Chilao. This resulted in some extremely sore muscles, but that's par for the course with trips like these. It's always worth it. We did our best to pick up the pieces (or just pick our tired bodies out of our sleeping bags) and pull the infamous tree-ride trials move. But after about 100 failed attempts, we began to risk missing our return flight. 
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 
 Carving turns is always fun, but it's especially amazing on really, really nice soil.
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Perhaps the most overdone trick of 2016, the stoppie will always be a fun challenge.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Taking the high road.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 And the even higher road.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Why do you ride? Is it for fun? Jeff loves mountain biking, and linking high speed, drifty corners is a key part of the sport.

As paradisiacal as it might have seemed to avoid the Washington winter for a few more days, family was beckoning: it's tough to go more than a weekend without reading Sheep in a Jeep or Good Night, Moon with my one-and-a-half year old, even when she demands that we re-read the books again immediately. 
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 I knew nothing about the new bike when it first landed on my doorstep. I had heard that Ibis' enduro race team had provided a lot of input on the new bike, so I was expecting something very long and slack to help on bike park style race courses. With slacked out, long wheelbase ideas in mind, I was quite surprised when I finally got out on the Ripmo. The back end was indeed short, and the reach was comfortably modern, but the front center felt, to me, much shorter than the HD4 I had been accustomed to riding. This fairly compact front end kept the bike handling more Porsche than Cadillac. That was a pleasant surprise on the tight trails nestled among the Southern California mountains.

We didn't clinch what would have been one final, banger move, but maybe that fits with the spirit of Los Angeles; we went there and did what we loved, but part of the dream was still elusive. As I sat in the two hours of traffic clogging the 36 mile drive to LAX airport, I marveled at the radness of the mountains.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Jeff and Logan taking a break mid-shoot.

Los Angeles--who knew?! You've got amazing mountains, with world-class singletrack crisscrossing down the steep slopes, among the chaparral and rattlesnakes. You've gotnuggets of radness a stone's throw nearly vacant campgrounds in the Alpine within an hour (sans traffic, of course) of downtown. I'm already planning a return trip for next winter.
 
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Los Angeles. YES, there are trails in those mountains!
 
Trails in Los Angeles? With Jeff Kendall-Weed
Produced by: Jeff Kendall-Weed @jeffweed.
Cinematography: Logan Patrick Nelson @loganpnelson.
Photography and guiding: John Watson.

Supported by: Ibis Cycles, Camelbak, Kali Protectives, & Kitsbow Cycling Apparel.
Jeff Kendall-Weed rides Los Angeles
 Follow me on Instagramsubscribe to his YouTube, or follow him on Facebook. Hope you enjoyed this video!


К другим материалам СМИ